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VODAVIRAL WOW

Traits That Make A Woman Beautiful (And They Have Nothing To Do With Looks)

Some people think that looks are really important, but the truth is that looks can – most of the times – be deceiving. We fail to become better persons because we are too busy improving our appearance, when, in reality, it’s our personality which will lead us to fulfilment.Women are tend to focus on their looks slightly more than men. What needs to be understood is that a woman, just like a man, can be really attractive, even if she’s not the prettiest girl in the world.Here are 11 traits that can make a woman beautiful:

1) Honesty

Honesty is one of the most important qualities for a woman to have. I can promise that if there’s one sure-fire waste of time in life, it’s strapping yourself to a liar. The thing about lying is that one lie can quickly lead to zero truth. Finding a girl who’s honest will provide a man with someone to trust and, more importantly, to trust in. There’s nothing more attractive than the latter.

2) Independence

A woman who is independent is a woman who doesn’t need a man by her side. She chooses to be with someone and that’s a different thing. But this woman values her job, her friends and her life in general as much as she values relationships. Sometimes, even more than that. No body wants a woman that is dependent on of them to do things. It’s important for a woman to be able to take care of herself. It’s also nice for a man to know that he can spend some guy time or alone time while his girlfriend is doing exactly the same thing.

3) Sense of humour

Who said that only men should have a good sense of humour? Women can be funny too. And there’s nothing more gorgeous than a hilarious woman! It’s nice for a man to be beside a woman who doesn’t take herself too seriously. Someone who isn’t afraid to be goofy. If a girl can make you laugh, what’s not to be attracted to? Wit is one of the most enjoyable forms of humour because it actually provokes thought. A woman who’s witty won’t need to constantly put people down to get a rise out of you, and that’s always attractive. Men want a woman who’s their conversation partner, not just an adoring fan.

4) Understanding

Understanding is a trait that’s really important for every healthy relationship. That’s why men tend to choose women who can understand them. A caring woman is not necessarily weak. On the contrary, she can love deeply and strongly. That’s what every single person looks for in the world: another person who can understand them.

5) Originality

There isn’t one way to be original. It might be her style or her love for new adventurous. The thing is that this girl is never boring. Originality is the anti-basic, the anti-boring. Originality is what will keep you guessing, and when a girl is truly original, this quality will constantly be reappearing in new, different ways. One thing is certain; this girl knows how to have fun.

6) Kindness

True kindness really is rare these days. Sure, you get people who are nice to those who hold some sort of value to them, but how many people do you meet every day that would go and talk to the lone stranger crying in the street? Men don’t want to be with a person that’s just nice to them, their friends, and their family. They want a person who can brighten up their day by brightening up the lives of everyone she comes in contact with. Kindness is vital within relationships to soften disagreements, there is nothing less attractive to a man than being constantly harshly berated and belittled by a woman, after all we are all human and have failings and shortcomings, the use of kindness in such situations helps to remind us we are all special unique individuals worthy of love, compassion and when needed, forgiveness.

7) Passion

It’s inspirational when anyone is really into something. Whether it’s a cause, a hobby or a job, seeing what gets a lady fired-up makes her more attractive (unless it’s dog fighting). Another thing that’s important: hobbies. Women with hobbies are sexy, even if those hobbies are, I don’t know, stamp-collecting. It doesn’t really matter. All hobbies come from a place of passion, and when looking for a woman to keep in your life – why not look for a passionate one?

8) Confidence

Physical attractiveness is only one side of the coin; mental attractiveness via confidence is the other. Combine an attractive women with confidence, and you have an unbeatable human being who can conquer the world and help you do the same. Confidence is one of the best—if not the best trait that a human can have. Confidence is a woman’s way of projecting that she knows exactly what she’s doing out in the world. She’s self-assured that she doesn’t give a shit what you or anyone else thinks. It also an instant reflection that she knows—and is ready to leverage—her intrinsically high value. Just like there’s nothing more attractive than a confident man, nothing can beat an attractive and confident woman.

9) Intelligence

It’s a myth that men prefer women who are naive or even stupid. Intelligence is sexy for both genders. Intelligent and clever men respect intelligent and clever women. A smart girl, a girl who knows what real life is all about is really, really attractive. Intelligence is possibly the most attractive quality you can find in a girl, even if it’s not accompanied by lots of college degrees.

10 Decisiveness

If there’s something that can piss off a man as much as an overly dependent or clingy woman, it’s a woman who can’t decide anything when faced with the most trivial choices, like picking a cheese in a supermarket. However, life decisions are far more important and that’s what I’m talking about: an attractive woman should have goals, should know what she wants from her life – and from her man as well. Goals show self-awareness. Setting goals shows that you know who you are today, and who you want to be, tomorrow. They also show that you’re ambitious, and mature enough to define your own wants from life – and yourself.

11) Loyalty

Loyalty is one of the best human traits. One can be loyal to a cause or to another person. One of the sexiest things that a woman can possess is loyalty to her man. That means she has values and is stands for something for concrete and static instead of blindly following her emotions for any new guy comes along, which doesn’t require much effort. Loyalty means she knows how to think logically instead of being held captive by her whimsical emotions.

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SPORT

11 o’clock and all’s silent on Wimbledon’s would-be Day 1

WIMBLEDON, England (AP) — When the clock struck 11 a.m. at the All England Club, there was silence.

Not because a player dressed all in white was about to whack a serve on one of Wimbledon’s many perfectly kept grass courts, but because there is no tennis this year at the oldest Grand Slam event in the world.

Monday should have been the the first day of the two-week Wimbledon tournament, and matches usually start just before noon on the outside courts. But because of the coronavirus pandemic, the tournament was canceled for the first time since World War II.

“Sad,” said Mary Robbins, a local resident who grew up in Wimbledon and relishes getting a glimpse of Roger Federer or Serena Williams walking through the neighborhood. “It’s been part of our lives forever.”

Every year, just in time for strawberry season in Britain, the world of tennis turns its focus to the All England Club. The traditional tennis whites worn by every player, the gleaming green grass at the start giving way to brown blotches along the baseline at the end, the majesty of Centre Court on the final weekend.

“It’s the highlight of the year for us,” said Robert McNicol, the librarian at the All England Club who has been working from home since March. “As somebody who loves tennis, it’s what I live for every year.”

But 2020 is not like any other year. The coronavirus has claimed more than 500,000 lives around the globe and caused havoc on much of the sports world. And while many sports have gotten back into action or are about to, Wimbledon decided in April to skip this year, in part because it had the foresight to buy insurance against a pandemic.

That insurance will certainly help the All England Club deal with the loss of income this year, but the local businesses in Wimbledon Village just up the hill from the grounds are going to take a big hit.

Normally, the shops, restaurants and bars fill their windows with tennis-related themes, hoping to draw in tennis-obsessed visitors. It’s like a little slice of tennis heaven for two weeks.

“The tennis quadruples my turnover, which allows me to pay my rent,” said Kelly Duffy, a restaurant owner whose patrons often include professional players and their families.

Duffy has been fortunate, though. Because she has a license to sell alcohol for takeaway as well as food, she’s been able to open her business through most of the lockdown, bringing in more money than usual in recent months.

Others haven’t been so lucky, first with the shutdown and now with the lack of tourists coming for the tennis.

“Getting new customers is important, so during the tennis it’s essential,” said Maria Di Nuzzo, the deputy manager of a clothing store in the village. “It’s definitely not like last year.”

One Italian restaurant summed up the mood with some fitting artwork on its front windows. One side shows the women’s and men’s trophies covered in a purple cloak with the year 2020 written above it. The other side shows the two trophies in all their glory under the year 2021.

The lack of footfall up in the village, however, doesn’t even compare to deserted feeling down the hill.

The club is open, and members can even play tennis. A group of white-clad players could be seen Monday through one of the many closed gates, looking as prim and proper as one would expect for such a hallowed place.

But there is no line of fans camping out waiting for tickets, known in these parts as “The Queue.” There is no hustle and bustle to get a seat on the outside courts when the gates burst open. There is no traffic jam with cars lined up to get onto the nearby golf course, which serves as a Wimbledon parking lot every year.

Instead, there are actual golfers on the golf course, adding to the overall eeriness of a world without Wimbledon.

“Strangely in the buildup, I’ve had the usual sense of anticipation, even though I knew it wasn’

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SPORT SPORT_NFL

Netflix series to dramatize Kaepernick’s path to activism

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Colin Kaepernick is joining with Emmy-winning filmmaker Ava DuVernay on a Netflix drama series about the teenage roots of the former NFL player’s activism.

“Colin in Black & White” will examine Kaepernick’s high school years to illuminate the experiences that shaped his advocacy, Netflix said Monday.

“Too often we see race and Black stories portrayed through a white lens,” Kaepernick said in a statement. “We seek to give new perspective to the differing realities that Black people face. We explore the racial conflicts I faced as an adopted Black man in a white community, during my high school years.”

Kaepernick, born to a white mother and Black father, was adopted in Wisconsin by a white couple who moved to California when he was a child.

In 2016, the San Francisco 49ers quarterback began kneeling during the national anthem to protest police brutality and racial inequality, drawing both support and criticism, with his detractors including President Donald Trump. Kaepernick became a free agent in 2017 but went unsigned.

Writing on the six-episode series was completed in May, the streaming service said. DuVernay, writer Michael Starrbury and Kaepernick are the executive producers. Kaepernick will appear as himself as the limited series’ narrator, Netflix said.

Further casting details and a release date were not immediately announced.

Kaepernick called it an honor to collaborate with DuVernay, whose credits include the award-winning “When They See Us,” which dramatized the Central Park Five case, and the Oscar-nominated documentary “13th.”

“With his act of protest, Colin Kaepernick ignited a national conversation about race and justice with far-reaching consequences for football, culture and for him, personally,” DuVernay said in a statement. “Colin’s story has much to say about identity, sports and the enduring spirit of protest and resilience.”

Kaepernick, who led the 49ers to the Super Bowl following the 2012 season, filed a grievance against the league in 2017, contending teams colluded to keep him out. The sides reached an undisclosed settlement in 2019.

The 32-year-old Kaepernick still wants an opportunity to play. A workout in Atlanta last November that was organized by the NFL turned chaotic and resulted in no job offers.

In the aftermath of nationwide protests following the death of George Floyd, NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell apologized to players for not listening to them earlier and encouraged them to protest peacefully. Goodell says he’s encouraged teams to sign Kaepernick.

“This young man is talented enough to play in the National Football League,” league executive Troy Vincent said recently.

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SPORT SPORT_MLB

Rebuilding MLB clubs hope to keep developing top prospects

SEATTLE (AP) — Seattle Mariners general manager Jerry Dipoto had at one point expected former first-round pick Logan Gilbert to be pitching at T-Mobile Park by the time June rolled around.

He also believed Jarred Kelenic, one of the top prospects in all of baseball, would likely soon follow him to the big leagues, set to join a group of prospects expected to be at the core of the Mariners’ rebuilding project.

“Eventually, our players are still going to hit the ground running and achieve whatever ceiling they were able to achieve,” Dipoto said. “It may just take a little bit longer.”

From Seattle to Kansas City, Baltimore to Miami, rebuilding teams that were hoping to see their young prospects play in the majors this season are reevaluating their plans.

The challenge: figure out how to get a substantive season in for some of the top talent in the minor leagues that these clubs are banking on to eventually become contributors if they ever want to climb out of division basements. And do it amid the coronavirus pandemic, which is likely to knock out all minor league play this year.

Is it worth starting the clock on the career of a top prospect for a truncated 60-game season? What about the taxi squad each team will keep? Is there enough of an opportunity for meaningful at-bats or innings to pitch? Could there be an expanded fall league option in Arizona, presuming health and safety concerns allow for that?

All key questions. None with straightforward answers.

“It is affecting all 30 clubs,” White Sox GM Rick Hahn said. “And it is something that as we head into the fall, winter, the 2021 season we’re going to have to adjust our expectations in terms of guys’ pacing, in terms of guys’ likelihood and timing at making an impact at the next level.”

The list of teams facing a significant rebuild is short. Seattle is there. So, too, are the Royals, Orioles and Tigers in the American League. In the National League, it’s more muddled outside of the Marlins, with a mix of teams good enough to stay in the race for 60 games but also looking ahead to the future.

The Marlins thought top prospect Sixto Sanchez might pitch in the majors this year. Now, is it worth it? Same for their top draft pick, Max Meyer out of Minnesota.

Will the Royals bring up Bobby Witt Jr.? What about Adley Rutschman in Baltimore or Kelenic in Seattle?

“You want to be 100% sure a player is ready to help you at the major league level before you add them. … There’s no minor leagues to send them down to if they struggle at the major league level,” Royals GM Dayton Moore said. “So it’s a unique situation, a unique challenge that we’re looking forward to, but we also have to think big picture as well.”

The teams caught in the middle are those who expected 2020 to be a springboard. They may have had key players who had a taste of the big leagues in 2019 and were hoping this season would be the transition into becoming contenders in 2021.

A prime example is Hahn and the White Sox.

“I’m of the mindset, and have been of the mindset, is what we’re building here is a multiyear project. It’s a multiyear endeavor,” Hahn said. “This was going to be sort of that first year of transitioning from the rebuild into that competitive stage, so it’s extremely important from our perspective to get these guys out there and competing.”

“We obviously have a young club, a team that’s only going to grow and benefit from playing experience during the regular season and hopefully the postseason, so getting a taste of that this season was of the utmost importance,” he said.

For the White Sox and others on the fringe of contention, it could mean taking a different approach to a 60-man group that includes the taxi squad. As in, would it be better to have players with big league experience available immediately if need be, or prepare prospects for the future?

In Seattle’s case, Dipoto said he’s now viewing the development of their prospects in a 17-month window. Whether it’s on the taxi squad or in some sort of fall league, what can they get accomplished this year? And how does that alter the time frame for where they should be in their development come 2021?

For a club that expected to start turning the corner next year, the developmental loss this season could be significant.

“We are viewing this as almost the beginning of an onboarding for the next 17 months and messaging it to the players like that,” Dipoto said. “We have your best interests in mind. We are going to preserve your health and well-being above all other things, and along the way we’re going to compete our butts off and try to win as many of these 60 games as we can win.

“And who knows what can happen in a season like that, when it’s 60 games. Anybody can get hot and make a run. And I guess to that extent we have as good a shot as anybody, but we’re also highly focused on the big picture and it will stay that way.”

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SPORT SPORT_Racing

Hamlin caps marathon day of racing at Pocono with 4th win

LONG POND, Pa. (AP) — Round 2 at Pocono went to Denny Hamlin. Hamlin seized the spotlight, specifically in victory lane when Pocono had to set up lights after the race ended in the dark.

Hamlin topped Kevin Harvick on Sunday night to win the second Cup race of the weekend at Pocono Raceway and flip the result of the opener. The 1-2 finish out of each driver is a clear sign two of the best drivers in the game are poised again to make a championship push.

Hamlin says, bring it on.

“We just want to get to the final four with a chance,” Hamlin said.

Hamlin has four wins this season for Joe Gibbs Racing and Harvick has three for Stewart-Haas Racing as they start to separate themselves from the rest of the field.

Hamlin is racking up milestones as he chases his first NASCAR Cup championship. Hamlin has 41 victories to move to 19th on NASCAR’s career list and his sixth win at Pocono matched Jeff Gordon for most at the 2½ mile tri-oval track.

“It’s hard to believe because we went through such a dry spell there in the middle of my career,” Hamlin said about his Pocono results.

Hamlin raced to his fourth victory of the season to cap a wild, marathon day of racing at the track, with three NASCAR races and nightfall in the finale. Pocono doesn’t have lights — but the pit road numbers were lit up and glowed as Hamlin won for the second straight year at Pocono.

Hamlin had a late vibration in his No. 11 Toyota on Saturday that hindered his attempt to catch Harvick down the stretch. About 25 hours later, Hamlin surged past Harvick and built a nearly 3-second lead once the SHR driver got caught up in lapped traffic.

“Our car was actually better today than it was yesterday,” Harvick said. “We had to run in a lot of traffic there and Denny kept ticking off laps.”

The Daytona 500 champion’s victory capped the first NASCAR tripleheader at one track. The race was delayed by lightning and rain, as much a part of Pocono as a JGR driver taking the checkered flag. Gibbs’ roster has six of the last seven winners at Pocono.

“I hate to feel disappointed in a second and a first, but man, I felt like I should have won both races,” Hamlin said.

They ran six laps before the race was red-flagged nearly 51 minutes because or rain. NASCAR ran several pace laps before the race finally went green around 6:15 p.m. It was a race against darkness to complete the full 350 miles.

Harvick won Saturday’s race and put the brakes on a burnout — he had to save that engine for another run in the same No. 4 Ford. The starting lineup was inverted for Sunday’s race so Harvick started 20th.

Erik Jones was third, Chase Elliott fourth and Aric Almirola was fifth.

The rain wreaked havoc with the third NASCAR race of the day at Pocono. Brandon Jones opened the day with a win in the Truck Series race and Chase Briscoe won the Xfinity race. Pocono became the first track in NASCAR history to hold three national series races on the same day.

Harvick was a fan of the Cup doubleheader format.

“I think everybody would be super happy with a much shorter season and multiple doubleheaders,” Harvick said.

NASCAR’s hope to capitalize on being about the only major sport to run live every week with sports on pause in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic has been besieged by weather issues. Sunday marked the ninth race out of 15 this season with a weather delay and three have been moved a full day. It’s hard to keep TV viewers interested when its a parade of Air Titans instead of a mad dash to the checkered flag.

Pocono is notorious for rainy weekends and in 2016 had two Cup races and an IndyCar race all washed out and run on Monday. The “Need Help or Info?” signs around the track went unneeded as the only thing in the grandstands was rain.

It put yet another damper on seven-time Jimmie Johnson’s farewell season. Johnson, a three-time winner at Pocono, was honored by the track over the weekend. Pocono painted “Jimmie” on one side of the start/finish line, added a painted “48 Jimmie Johnson” rock to their infield collection of race legends, and his two young daughters gave the command for the driver’s to start their engines. He finished 16th.

But he also gave some inspiration to Hamlin.

“Maybe one day I’ll get one of those black rocks they’ve got here for all those good guys that have won it,” Hamlin said.

He might get the rock, esepcially if he can pass Hall of Famer Gordon. The 39-year-old Hamlin feels he has plenty of time and talent left in the tank to set that mark.

“I don’t think this is the last one,” Hamlin said.

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SPORT SPORT_MLB

A long-overdue ‘Tip of the Cap’ to baseball’s Black pioneers

Barack Obama tipped his cap. So did three other former U.S. presidents and a host of prominent civil rights leaders, entertainers and sports greats in a virtual salute to the 100-year anniversary of the founding of baseball’s Negro Leagues.

The campaign launched Monday with photos and videos from, among others, Hank Aaron, Rachel Robinson, Derek Jeter, Colin Powell, Michael Jordan, Obama and fellow former Presidents George W. Bush, Bill Clinton and Jimmy Carter at tippingyourcap.com.

On the receiving end of those tributes are many of the Negro Leagues’ greatest alumni: Satchel Paige, Josh Gibson, “Cool Papa” Bell and Jackie Robinson, who began with the Kansas City Monarchs and went on to break the color barrier in the major leagues with the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1947. Not long after, with many of its best players gradually following Robinson’s path, the Negro Leagues ceased operations.

Singer Tony Bennett, showing his heart, tips a San Francisco Giants cap. Californian Billie Jean King opts for the Los Angeles Dodgers. Clinton said he chose a Chicago Cubs cap in honor of Ernie Banks, the late Hall of Famer who got his start in the Negro Leagues.

But, Clinton added: “This cap is for Hillary, too, when finally, the Cubs won the championship. Long before that, the Negro Leagues made baseball better and America better.”

The celebration was moved online after a major league-wide tribute to baseball’s Black pioneers scheduled for June 27 was shelved — along with the games — because of the coronavirus pandemic. At first, Negro Leagues Baseball Museum president Bob Kendrick worried that his longstanding plan to honor the men and women who battled long odds for a game of their own would have to be postponed, at best.

“In our game, there’s nothing more honorable than tipping your cap,” Kendrick said. “And once I realized that national day of recognition was going to fall by the wayside, I thought, ‘OK, maybe we can do it next year.’ But that didn’t really do it.

“So then I thought, ’How about a virtual tip of the cap?‴ Kendrick paused, then chuckled. “And let me say here and now, there is no way I could have done this myself. I could not be more proud of the response.”

Kendrick got the lift he was looking for from communications specialist Dan McGinn and longtime NLBM supporter Joe Posnanski, a sports writer for The Athletic and author of “The Soul of Baseball,” chronicling his yearlong road trip promoting the Kansas City-based museum and the stories behind it with legendary Negro League star, the late Buck O’Neil.

O’Neil was the driving force behind the museum for decades. The NLBM has expanded several times since Rube Foster, as skilled an executive as he was a baseball pitcher, founded the first Negro National League at a YMCA on the same site in 1920.

Kendrick said his personal favorite tribute came from Jackie Robinson’s family.

“It’s Rachel tipping her cap, but there’s four generations of Robinson women in that video talking about our common cause and it evokes the kind of emotion at a time when our country really needs it,” he said.

“And you know,” he added a moment later, “it’s funny how this whole thing worked out. I always felt if there was going to be conversations about race in sports, the Negro Leagues should be at the center, because that’s the story: They triumphed over adversity.

“I got to know so many of them, and not a single guy that I met ever harbored ill will, at least to the point where they let it block their path. Everybody else thought the major leagues were better, but you couldn’t convince them,” he concluded. “They just wanted the chance to prove they could play this game as well as anybody else.”

They did, forging a rich legacy that will echo with a new generation thanks to something as simple as the virtual tip of a cap.

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SPORT SPORT_NFL

Pats fined $1.1M, lose pick for filming game last season

NEW YORK (AP) — The New England Patriots have been fined $1.1 million by the NFL for inappropriately filming the Cincinnati Bengals’ sideline during a game last season.

On Sunday, the league also took away a third-round pick in the 2021 draft.

Also, the team’s production crew will not be allowed to shoot any games in the 2020 season.

ESPN first reported the penalties. NFL spokesman Michael Signora confirmed the discipline to The Associated Press.

The filming occurred at the Bengals game at Cleveland on Dec. 8 of last season. The Bengals hosted the Patriots the following week and lost 34-13.

When the taping became known last season, the team said at the time a three-person crew producing a web series titled “Do Your Job” “inappropriately filmed the field from the press box” as part of a feature on the scouting department.

The filming took place “without specific knowledge of league rules,” the statement said.

Also, the team’s statement last season said that while they were granted credentials for the crew from the Browns, “our failure to inform the Bengals and the league was an unintended oversight.”

When confronted, the team said the crew “immediately turned over all footage to the league and cooperated fully.”

At the time, Patriots coach Bill Belichick says neither he nor his coaching staff had watched any of the video footage.

“I personally have never viewed any video footage at all, anything that those production people have done, other than what’s shown on public television or something like that,” Belichick said in December.

Previously, New England was fined $250,000 and lost a first-round draft pick in 2007 for violating NFL rules against using video to steal signals in a scandal dubbed “Spygate.” Belichick was also fined $500,000.

Spygate fueled a distrust of the Patriots that persisted when the team was accused of illegally deflating the footballs used in the 2015 AFC championship game.

The punishment by the NFL in that case was also severe. Quarterback Tom Brady was suspended four games, and the team was fined $1 million and docked another first-round draft pick.

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Inspiring OMG VODAVIRAL

Teen Figure Skater Lands Hardest Routine In History To Earn Spot At Olympics

Making athletic history is no easy feat. But making athletic history while earning a spot on one of the most prestigious sports team around? That’s outright amazing.

And that’s exactly what Nathan Chen did during his figure skating routine at the 2018 United States National Championships earlier this week.

The athlete, who is only 18 years old, took to the ice at the SAP Center in San Jose, California looking confident and collected, despite the immense pressure he’s under. He’s about to attempt a routine that would literally go down in history if executed flawlessly—all while vying for a spot on the Team USA Olympic figure skating team.

The announcer’s voice informs that Nathan in the youngest of five children born to Chinese immigrants, and that in 2010, he told sportscaster Andrea Joyce that he’d be at the Olympics in 2018.

The realization of his prediction quite literally rests on his performance, which involves landing five quadruple jumps in a single program. No other skater in history has ever accomplished this difficult feat.

Despite the fact that he’s been sick and struggling in practice, Nathan’s routine starts off strong. He soars across the ice in a black unitard with a balletic sense of grace that many figure skaters strive for but never perfect.

When it comes time for his first jump sequence, a triple into his first quad, you can feel the tension—but Nathan completes it with apparent ease.

He continues his routine, seamlessly moving into complex footwork and a gorgeous spin. The music seems to be using his body as a physical vessel, directing his limbs how to flow like liquid across the ice.

After he nails his second and third quad jumps, it feels as if you could cut the tension in the air with butter. His nearly perfect routine all comes down to his one final jump, which he brilliantly lands. Finishing in a flurry of footwork and spins, the routine is an astounding display or artistry and athleticism.

Nathan leaves the ice with a knowing smile on his face and sits down with his coach to await the scores. Once it’s confirmed that he scored over a 100—a 104.45, to be exact–he knows he’s not only won the US championship, but that he’s also headed to PyeongChang to compete among the best in the world for the gold.

Watch his astounding performance below and share if you can’t wait to watch Nathan compete in the Olympics!

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SPORT SPORT_NHL

NHL not planning to quarantine players for training camps

Jason Spezza’s confidence in the NHL returning has not been shaken by word of 11 fellow players testing positive for the coronavirus.

Given his involvement in NHL Players’ Association talks, the veteran Toronto forward knew from doctors’ input there would be positive test results in hockey just as there have been in other sports as group workouts ramp up across North America.

Those very well may continue to happen with training camps scheduled to open July 10, yet deputy commissioner Bill Daly confirmed Thursday the league and NHLPA are not considering putting teams in quarantined “bubbles” for those mandatory sessions. Instead, players are being instructed to stay home when not at the rink, with the hope that frequent testing and health protocols will prevent any outbreaks before, hopefully, games resume in two “hub” cities in late July.

“I’m pretty confident that once we get into hub cities, we’ll be able to do a good job of keeping it out,” Spezza said. “I think getting there is going to be the challenge, and that’s where it takes a little bit of discipline for us as players to make sure we don’t kind of derail the plans.”

The league and players are still working to finalize a return-to-play agreement that would entail a 24-team playoff to award the Stanley Cup. It’s understood that players, coaches and staff would be quarantined from the general public for the duration of the playoffs and tested regularly.

Until arriving in one of those cities as early as July 23 or 24, players and their families are still out in the real world and face the risk of exposure.

“You have a whole bunch of people in close proximity to each other for prolonged periods of time, they may be traveling together exposed to other individuals that you don’t know who they’ve been exposed to,” Atrium Health medical director of infection prevention Katie Passaretti said. “Any time you’re bringing groups together and then sending them back out into the world, there’s potential for further spread if one of those individuals was asymptotically infected or early in the stages of symptomatic infection.”

The U.S. recorded 34,500 COVID-19 cases Wednesday, just shy of the peak of infections set in late April.

“There’s lots of people everywhere testing positive,” said Spezza, who’s in his 17th NHL season. “Us as players, we realize there’s going to be some risk of a positive test, especially in the phases that we’re in right now.”

Voluntary workouts of up to six players on the ice at a time were able to begin June 8, with that limit increased to 12 this week amid stringent safety protocols. In other sports, Major League Baseball closed its training facilities in Florida and Arizona, and the NFLPA told its members to stop private workouts in light of rising coronavirus numbers in some places.

The Tampa Bay Lightning closed their facilities last week after three players and additional staff tested positive. The NHL announced 11 positives among more than 200 players tested.

“It’s definitely eye-opening to hear, but at the same time, looking back going into it, you certainly expect that to pop up,” Boston defenseman Matt Grzelcyk said. “You see more and more cases popping up across the league and that’s to be expected, as well. But at the same time, it’s still a little nerve-wrecking.”

Two weeks away from the scheduled start of camps and less than a month from when games might begin, some players still have questions.

“Obviously health and safety is the biggest,” Montreal goaltender Carey Price said. “Being able to come to a situation where you don’t have to worry about contracting COVID-19 is huge. To ‘bubble’ the players and feel safe in your work environment is going to be probably the most paramount.”

Players are expected to be tested daily once competition starts, and they will be isolated with each other. Even with frequent testing during camps, it seems to be incumbent on players, coaches, staff and those around them to be particularly vigilant away from hockey.

“As everything around us starts opening up, we almost have to tighten up because we’re going back to play,” Spezza said. “We have to be probably a little more careful as we get closer to training camp here.”

One concern is for coaches and executives in the older age range that makes them more vulnerable to the virus. The Canadiens said 60-year-old coach Claude Julien intends on being behind the bench because “he has full confidence in the league’s ability to set in place the security measures necessary to ensure the safety of it all.”

Training camp, when upwards of 30 players will be together, is the first test of those procedures.

“I think everybody’s doing the best possible job they can to put everyone in the best position to stay healthy, and that’s the No. 1 priority is health and safety of the players and everyone else involved,” Pittsburgh goalie Matt Murray said. “Nothing is going to be perfect.”

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Nats star Ryan Zimmerman’s AP diary: To play or not to play?

EDITOR’S NOTE: Ryan Zimmerman is a two-time All-Star infielder who has played 15 years in the majors, all with the Washington Nationals. He holds most of the team’s career hitting records, and his two homers and seven RBIs last postseason helped the Nationals win their first World Series championship. Zimmerman has been offering his thoughts — as told to AP Sports Writer Howard Fendrich — in a diary of sorts while waiting for baseball to return. In the 10th installment, the 35-year-old Zimmerman discusses what’s on his mind now that there is a plan in place for a 2020 season.

I’m still deciding whether to play.

When it comes down to it, it’s a decision not just for me, but for my family as well.

I have a 3-week-old baby. My mother has multiple sclerosis and is super high-risk; if I end up playing, I can pretty much throw out the idea of seeing her until weeks after the season is over.

There’s a lot of factors that I and others have to consider. I don’t think there’s a right or wrong answer; it’s everybody’s individual choice.

At the end of the day, does a player feel comfortable going to the field every day and — in my case, more importantly — feel comfortable coming home every day and feel like they’re not putting anyone else in danger?

I am by no means someone who thinks we all need to hide in our houses until a vaccine is found. That’s not feasible for anybody. We just need to do things in a sensible, smart way.

I don’t want to be a pessimist about this. I hope that, whatever I decide, the season goes off well, nothing happens, nobody gets seriously sick.

But there are a lot of moving parts and a lot of variables we’re not going to be able to control. That’s what we need to assess.

There’s a lot of talk about rule changes for extra innings and the DH; in my mind, what better year to try some of this stuff out?

With a 60-game season, there’s going to be people who think certain things about this year, anyway. So if you’re thinking about changing things in the game at some point, this is the perfect year to see if people in baseball and fans like it, see if they don’t.

But I’m thinking more about the health and safety perspective — and the toughest part for us is going to be the travel aspect of it.

That includes for “spring training,” when people are going to be flying in from all across the country and from out of the country, as well. It’ll be interesting to see just how that part of it works out, with so many people going from wherever they are and gathering together all of a sudden.

We haven’t seen a schedule yet, but I’m going to assume 30 games are on the road. I don’t know how long the trips are going to be, but it’s a significant amount of travel and staying in hotels and going places that are outside of where we’ve been allowed to go the last few months.

Once games begin in the NBA and NHL, they’re not going to travel from city to city. Once they’re in their places, they’re there.

And I’ll tell you this about baseball: The owners aren’t going to be traveling with us. I’m pretty sure they’re going to be hanging out at their houses, watching baseball on TV.

We’re going to be the ones out there, if we decide to play. We’re the ones taking all the risk.

If you’re going to participate, there are rules you have to follow. The “bubble” is only as good as the people inside of the “bubble.” It’s not like there’s going to be COVID police on our hotel floors.

So it will come down to the players and everyone involved and what they do with each and every second of their day.

When you start thinking about it like that, it starts becoming a little more complicated.