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UC Davis treats pets badly burned by wildfire

UC Davis Medical Teaching Hospital has seen an influx as animals affected by the wildfires come in for treatment

The California wildfires haven’t just been hard on residents of the Golden State. According to The Sacramento Bee, dozens of pets, mostly cats, have been admitted to the UC Davis Medical Teaching Hospital for burn treatment.

“We don’t see significant burn injuries very often,”said Dr. Erik Wisner who works as a radiology specialist at UC Davis. Injuries range from small burns and respiratory problems due to smoke to faces burned raw and bandages on all four legs.

UC Davis has seen other animals amid this string of horrific wildfires. Four horses, two chickens, two pigs, a dog, and a goat have all been checked in as patients at the Medical Teaching Hospital. Cats have been the main victims among pets though, as felines are more likely to run and hide during the chaos whereas dogs are easier to get out of the house.

Thankfully, nearly all of the pets coming in for treatment will survive. And many of the animals found have been picked up by their owners thanks to messages on the UC Davis Facebook page. Those who haven’t will be put up for adoption once they have recovered, and a number of firefighters have shown interest in adopting if the original owners don’t return.

But there is a long road of recovery ahead for the felines with the worst injuries. Like Aida, who had severe burns on her paw pads and face.

“I’m just going to hold her for awhile, until she gets a little more comfortable,” said Robin Fisher, the veterinary technician who had just given Aida a thorough cleaning and some medicine to stave off the pain. “We’re going to do everything we possibly can for her.”

The UC Davis Medical Teaching Hospital is doing all it can for all of its patients, and is collecting donations from the public to help with the costs of treating the sudden influx of animals. Readers who are interested in donating can follow the link to the UC Davis Veterinary Medicine webpage.

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